The far horizons

February 29th, 2016 | Posted by | 2 Comments

“The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page,” St Augustine.

Many young Canadians view studying in the United States as studying abroad. But Raed Ayad says that although both Canada and the US have much to offer prospective students, there is a whole world outside of the two countries which can offer them an even richer experience.

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INTO’s Global Recruitment Conference is this week delivering on its own mission statement – Innovation, Collaboration and Education. In a nod to this theme of three, and not necessarily in that order, INTO Internal Communications Manager Mary Kalmus presents her favourite daily Thai takeaways…

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Raed Ayad currently works for INTO as a Research and Policy Analyst.  As a Canadian citizen who has studied in Canada and in the UK, he offers his reflections on the change in Government in Canada and its potential implications for Canadian international education strategy.

On October 20th, 2015 the front page of one of Canada’s leading newspapers, the Toronto Star, read It’s a New Canada with a photo of newly-elected Prime Minister Justin Trudeau celebrating his historic win with his family and supporters.

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It’s that time of year again. The Institute of International Education Open Doors project has published its comprehensive overview of international students studying the United States. This year’s report records the largest rise in international enrollments for 35 years, increasing by 10 per cent over last year and recording close to one million students.

Indeed, the most recent SEVIS by the Numbers report from August 2015 indicates this number has already been exceeded. The data also comes hot on the heels of Australian reports which indicate that demand for international education continues to grow.

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A recent feature in UK magazine, Education Investor estimated that INTO is the market leader in terms of volumes of international students attracted to the United States pathway sector.

In this piece, we explore some of the numbers and the data we have used to calculate the impact of our partnerships in the United States and the United Kingdom. These are drawn from public sources and can be used by colleagues throughout the sector to measure their own performance.

This blog focuses on three elements of impact; enrollment growth, student outcomes and wider economic impact. The detailed case studies for Oregon State University (OSU), University of South Florida (USF) and Newcastle University also cover student diversity and student experience measures.

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Traditional destination countries can expect to see more international students in the coming year according to a survey of more than 750 student recruitment organizations from 69 different countries.

The poll, conducted in March 2015 by INTO University Partnerships indicates that the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and Canada will all see an increase. Perhaps most surprisingly, for those based in the UK at least, is that 72 per cent of those surveyed believe they will be sending more students in the coming 12 months.

The annual survey also reveals the importance of service for counsellors and the link to employability as a key motivating factor for students wishing to study overseas.

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The Global Village at Oregon State University is a living learning community based on cultural exchange and it was felt that an international service experience would support the program perfectly.

 In August 2014 INTO OSU student engagement coordinators, Casey Glick and Allen Dean, volunteered on a summer camp for orphans and vulnerable children run by I-CCO – a project supported by INTO Giving.

The purpose of the trip was to give Casey and Allen an understanding of how the camp is run so that they would be able to prepare OSU students from the Global Village for a volunteering trip there next year. Here is Casey’s account of a typical day in the summer camp.

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More than 880 respondents from 63 countries participated in the 2014 INTO global educational counsellor survey.  The results have once again supported some of the wider mega-trends in international education – including the rise of China, the growth in awareness of online education and the increasing importance of student advocacy.   But one of the the key messages emerging from this survey is that  while agents cite rankings most often when counselling students, it is the basics of service quality – response times to enquiries and applications, which they value most highly in their relationships with client institutions.

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About the respondents

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Oregon State University’s International Living-Learning Center (ILLC) is symbolic of many things: a shift in the approach to serving international students; the power of collaboration; and the globalization of higher education. The modern, elegant aesthetic reflects the building’s purpose – to represent the institution’s vision of a 21st century education.

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The Times Higher Education supplement published the chart, below on 24th April 2014 exploring which mission group in UK Higher Education is most attractive to international students.

As we are launching our own regular chart-inspired blog we thought taking a closer look at this might be a good place to start.

 

 

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